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January 10, 2010

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Vicky de Monterey Richoux

It's been over a year since I was in Scott's class, but with every book I read and every paper I write at UCSC, I'm still applying much of what he taught. When new students groan at a difficult assignment or at the toil required for the upcoming symposium, they should know that I'm still grateful for for every time he inspired or goaded me to reach a bit farther than I thought I could.

Yan Wang

Here's what I think was an early rough draft of my proposal--followed by a more polished version.

Proposal Abstract Rough Draft:

Breaking out of the Brown Envelop: ePortfolio and Their Role in the Learning Process.

Career portfolios have been used to apply for college programs, higher salaries, and showcase transferable skills. However, even though we are well into the digital age, students are still filing their old course work away in dusty cabinets and brown portfolio folders. But with the coming of Web 2.0, a myriad of tools have been made available for students to showcase their work and experiences.

My presentation will demonstrate the ease of creating a ePortfolio by using various Web 2.0 applications. I believe that if students were able to document and update their portfolio, it would improve their learning process and keep them in check with their career goals. And finally, I will address the benefits of a network of ePortfolios and how it would improve the process of learning, certificating skills and course work, job seeking, and furthering the education of the greater academic community.

Works Cited

Barrett, Helen C.. "ePortfolio Mash Up with GoogleApps." ePortfolio Mash Up with GoogleApps. September 30, 2008 . 30 Jan 2009 .

Bejar, Denis. "ePortfolios Benefits ." ePortfolio at LaGuardia Community College. Jan 08, 2009. LaGuardia Community College. 30 Jan 2009 .

Etc.

Proposal Abstract Second Draft:

Brieaking out of the Brown Envelope: How Comprehensive ePortfolios Can Catalyze Student Learning

Although early generation ePortfolios were viewed largely as isolated artifacts, comprehensive career portfolios strive to join academic, extracurricular, and workforce learning in a single overarching and easily affordable online package to advance learning, certification, and career advancement. Based on local research into current student eportfolios as well as international educational literature surveys, my research supports the idea that comprehensive eportfolios can be produced at low to no cost--with invaluable benefits.

Vicky de Monterey Richoux

my proposal, in case it helps. All power to this year's applicants - give it your best shot, you may surprise yourself!

Title: Taking The Trade: Herbal Abortifacients in the Nineteenth Century and Today

Why does herbal abortifacient use continue today, when legal medication abortion is readily available? As recently as the 19th century, women commonly helped each other manage their fertility with the aid of herbal abortifacients gathered in the fields and woods or purchased through the mails. By 1880, moral and legal changes shifted control of women’s fertility to the licensed medical community. Despite the recent advent of legal medication abortion, limited use of herbal abortifacients continues today. Beginning with Professor Helen Lefkowitz Horowitz’ book Rereading Sex: Battles Over Sexual Knowledge and Suppression in Nineteenth Century America, I’ve done further research on both 19th and 20th century reproductive medicine. My research has led me to conclude that access, privacy and control remain valid reasons why some women use herbal abortifacients today.

An examination of women’s use of herbal abortifacients in 19th century America, and an exploration of reasons why some women still use them.

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